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Cybersecurity: How to protect your work devices from malware and more

Cybersecurity: How to protect your work devices from malware

In the two previous blog posts in our cybersecurity series, we explain how you can protect yourself against phishing and other threats and how to choose a secure password. In this article, you’ll learn what you can do to protect your mobile devices against viruses and malware, especially in times when remote work has become the new normal.

Cybersecurity in the workplace

Particularly since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, workplaces have been massively virtualised through both remote work and external access to company-managed networks. As a result, the number of devices with access to corporate resources has significantly increased, thus lowering many companies’ overall security levels. There’s less device management and fewer security measures to combat cyber threats and adequately manage access control.

Recommendations for admins

Try to keep your systems up to date at all times. Have antivirus and anti-malware programmes installed, and make sure that people can’t just disable or bypass them. Encrypt your storage media and use biometric data or adequately complex credentials to safeguard access to your systems. It’s also important that you implement relevant cataloguing procedures, as well as device and patch management.

Training for staff members

Remember to train your staff on how to use these devices correctly. The most common issues can be traced back to the misuse of staff privileges and a lack of compliance with cybersecurity policies.

Remember to train your staff on how to use these devices correctly. The most common issues can be traced back to the misuse of staff privileges and a lack of compliance with cybersecurity policies.

Alexander Warschun, IT Operations Officer at Unite

Sometimes company equipment may also be used for leisure purposes. There needs to be clear guidelines on what’s allowed and what isn’t. Company devices are sometimes used in unsafe locations. Staff members need to know how to lock and encrypt their systems. Mobile devices must be secure and comply with internal policies. The risks of using public Wi-Fi and reporting procedures in case of a suspected security alert need to be clearly outlined.

Cybersecurity along the supply chain

All of the aspects mentioned above pose major risks in businesses, especially for companies with tens of thousands of transactions every month. Offers, contracts, invoices or other confidential documents are transmitted via electronic data communication systems. There are often several automated checks to make sure that incoming and outgoing files aren’t infected with malware. The biggest risk, however, is when people process messages manually. That’s why training your staff and raising awareness is so crucial.

And what about credentials that are no longer private? Imagine cybercriminals taking over your customer or supplier accounts. They could place orders or generate invoices that might result in financial loss even for other members along the supply chain. In any case, it’s essential for companies to understand that the entire supply chain could be attacked at any time. It’s up to all of us to ensure that cybersecurity is taken seriously.

There are several other technical and organisational measures to consider when it comes to protecting companies against cyber threats. This article merely highlights the most commonly and successfully used measures worldwide.

About the author

Alexander Warschun

I’m Unite’s IT Operations Officer, responsible for the smooth and secure operation of our platform. I like working at Unite because I have a lot of creative freedom and get to contribute my own ideas. In addition, new and exciting challenges always ensure that I develop further.

Copyright Keyvisual: Eric Kemmnitz